Film and Media Studies

BA Major, Minor

students on a video production set

In Film and Media Studies at Emory, you’ll explore how sounds and images create ideas as you examine the theory, history, and practices underlying film and television. The rigorous curriculum includes screenings, readings, class discussions, guest lecturers, and hands-on projects and workshops.

Students develop technical and analytical skills to see how films not only tell stories, but also influence perceptions.

Learn all of this with Atlanta as your backdrop. Home to such studio powerhouses as Pinewood Studios and Tyler Perry Studios, Atlanta is known as the Hollywood of the South. The city is 3rd in the nation, behind L.A. and New York City, for being the homebase film location of global blockbusters.

Outcomes

Many of our film studies graduates go on to workin the entertainment industry. But an equal number have used the critical thinking and communication skills they develop as a basis for successful careers in medicine, law, business, journalism, and teaching. 

Recent graduates work at CNN, Marvel Entertainment, Gumbo Productions, Abrams Artists Agency, Cox Media Group, Crisp Video Group, and Crazy Legs Production.

455
The number of film and TV productions in Georgia in 2018
Atlanta Journal Constitution
15
Number of top box office earners, filmed in Georgia in 2017

Examples of Classes

Digital Media and Culture

In this course, you’ll explore the ways computer and digital technologies have changed the way we think, communicate, express ourselves, learn, and interact with the world.

Non-Western National Cinemas

Examine the development of Non-Western film genres – such as Anime – in terms of aesthetic, theoretical, and sociopolitical dimensions.

Screenwriting

An intensive writing workshop at Oxford College focused on screenplay construction and formatting and pre-production planning.

Outside the Classroom

students on an outdoor film production

What makes a person a monster?

In a contemporary reimagining of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein,” born from class collaboration, Emory students, faculty, and staff worked with film and television professionals to write and produce “Fran K,” an original short film that tackles the ongoing questions around ethics in science.